Showing posts with label BINGHAMTON NY CIRCA 1909 TO CURRENT DATE EVERYBODY IS LEAVING. Show all posts
Showing posts with label BINGHAMTON NY CIRCA 1909 TO CURRENT DATE EVERYBODY IS LEAVING. Show all posts

Saturday, June 14, 2008

BINGHAMTON NY CIRCA 1909 TO CURRENT DATE EVERYBODY IS LEAVING


Maxian's Lunch room 122 Clinton St Binghamton NY circa 1909, to the left. Downtown Binghamton NY in 2008, old brown decayed buildings the Stone Opera House on Chenango St, bricks have been falling into the street below. Binghamton is the seat of justice for Broome County. Situated at the junction of the Susquehanna and the Chenango rivers, it was for a long time known simply as Chenango Point. The site of Binghamton presents one of the most picturesque and beautiful landscapes that can easily be imagined. It is a slightly undulating plain, cut by the Susquehanna, running from east to west, and the Chenango, running from north to south, and almost completely surrounded by high hills, which add greatly to the general attractiveness of the scene.
Binghamton NY nothing has changed (other than unemployment) or been upgraded since 1909, a City in decay with no way out. Until the end of the American Revolution, the area that is today Binghamton was inhabited by Native Americans. Upon the very site of our town -- so says tradition -- a brigade of troops, under General James Clinton, father of our own DE WITT CLINTON, on their way to join General Sullivan, encamped two nights. As part of the Iroquois Confederacy, and considered a threat to the revolutionists' efforts, the Sullivan-Clinton campaign was used to remove the Native American population.
With the opening of the Erie Canal, this area, like many, sought their own canal to connect to the Erie to aid development. Finally in 1834, work began on the Chenango Canal, a 97-mile long engineering marvel which connected Binghamton in the south with Utica and the Erie Canal in the north. The first packet boat arrived in 1837 and new development followed the route of the canal. Despite the economic failure of the canal (it never made a profit), the area benefited from the arrival of new settlers and merchandise, as well as providing a means of shipping finished goods in and out of the area. Mills sprang up along the southern end of the canal, and department stores and hotels rose along the retail corridor.
In 1848, the Erie railroad arrived, and the coming of the "iron horse" spelled the end for the canal. Within two decades the area had become a transportation hub, with north-south and east-west railroad lines and the canal. But by 1874, the Chenango Canal route was closed in Binghamton, the only remnants being a proposed expansion along the Susquehanna River that would later become part of the Vestal Parkway.

By far, however, the area was truly changed with the arrival of the first cigar manufacturing company in the 1870's. By 1890 over fifty factories were operating with five thousand people involved in the manufacture of over 100 million cigars each year. Binghamton ranked only behind New York City as the top cigar-making city in the country. Immigrants from Eastern Europe and other countries poured into the area to work in this industry, or one of the many other companies producing over two hundred different types of products in Binghamton by the turn of the century.


Binghamton's population began to increase -- doubling every ten to fifteen years. It reached its height of 85,000 by the mid-1950s. Despite the largeness of the cigar making industry, it had all but disappeared by 1930 due to the rise in popularity of the cigarette, automation, and labor unrest. Many of the former cigar workers took solace in finding employment in the factories of the Endicott-Johnson Shoe Corporation. Begun as Lester Brothers Boot and Shoe Company in Binghamton in 1854, it moved to create its own company town, Lestershire, to the west of Binghamton.

Binghamton's effort at "Urban Renewal" in the 1960s only led to large empty lots and empty storefronts. But a resurgence based on diversity of business and slower growth has helped to bring the city moving back toward its former levels of employment and industrial strength (not hardly). Source - NY-Chapter Y GWRRA, http://www.tier.net/~gwrra/carohist.htm
2008....Nothing has been upgraded....Downtown area of Binghamton NY is in complete decay, the old office buildings from the early 1900's are actually falling into the streets below, funding to even demolish these decrepit buildings is lacking from the City or even the State of NY.

Ground Round Grill & Bar 214 Reynolds Rd Johnson City NY Across From Oakdale Mall Shuts Down Permanently With No Warning, Mall is also on verge of closing. Sign of The Times: Oakdale Mall Reynolds Rd Johnson City on Verge of Closing and Press & Sun Bulletin Newspaper Printing Plant in Johnson City NY Shuts Down Lays Off 100. If the Oakdale Mall does shut down, local consumers will have little cause to drive up Reynolds Rd, especially in the winter time, to do their shopping.
WNBF--Employees and customers of the Ground Round restaurant in Johnson City were stunned to learn the place had gone out of business.When workers showed up Wednesday morning to open the eatery, they were greeted with signs in the entrances stating it had "PERMANENTLY CLOSED."Dan Warner, a Johnson City resident who had worked at the restaurant for more than eight years, said he was shocked when he saw the notices. Dan Warner said: "It's like a kick in the butt." Warner said the Ground Round had a "normal-type crowd" Tuesday when he left. He estimated about 40 people had worked there.
JOHNSON CITY (WBNG) -- The Ground Round corporate office says it did not receive any warning that the Ground Round Grill & Bar in Johnson City was closing until Wednesday morning. A corporate representative tells 12 News the local store owner had a franchise agreement with the company since 2008 that was renewed on a yearly basis. The official says the owner broke the franchise agreement that ran through July 15, 2019. They say the owner is subject to penalties for breaking the agreement. According to the representative, the owner claimed they are still rethinking what to do with the store and property, but did not give any specifics. 12 News has reached out several times to the local owner, who has not responded.

UPDATE FRI 8/24/2018 JOHNSON CITY (WBNG) -7 STORES CLOSED IN 17 MONTHS- MACY'S, OUTDOOR's STORE, SEARS, TOYS R' US, NEW YORK & COMPANY, GROUND ROUND GRILL & BAR, and next BON TON in the Oakdale Mall...In the wake of another store closing on Wednesday, 12 News is taking a look at what's behind the closures. In just a few blocks, at least seven commercial stores have shut down in the past 17 months. In March 2017 Macy's started the parade out of town when it closed its doors in the Oakdale Mall. A few streets over, the Outdoor's Store, Gander Mountain left in June. Then Sears at the Oakdale Mall said goodbye in September 2017. Although the closures didn't stop there. Toys R' Us was next to leave a shuttered building behind in June 2018. Then in July, New York and Company in the Oakdale Mall announced its closure. Leading up to August 2018 when Ground Round Grill and Bar had an abrupt and permanent departure. Leaving Bon Ton as the latest store on the radar to close, as it's counting down the days from leaving Johnson City. 12 News went searching for answers as to why these stores are leaving. "It's been decades of decline and it takes a lot longer to clean up as mess than it does to make one," said Corinna Johnson adding, "there are no jobs, we were an industrial area, it's not there you can't bring people in if you don't have jobs, you can't fill store fronts if there's nobody to buy."

Sign of The Times: Oakdale Mall Reynolds Rd Johnson City on Verge of Closing and Press & Sun Bulletin Newspaper Printing Plant in Johnson City NY Shuts Down Lays Off 100. In a double whammy to the Binghamton NY area business and economy, the closing of the Press & Sun Bulletin Newspaper Printing Plant at 10 Gannett Drive Johnson City and the Oakdale Mall with entrance Reynolds Rd Johnson City NY on the verge of collapse, will cause a devastating trickle down effect on neighboring small business's. With a population decline of about 50% in the last 25 years for the Binghamton-Johnson City area and shootings, murder, and drug dealing on the rise, the Binghamton-Johnson City area needs to somehow reinvent itself.