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Thursday, February 23, 2017

Florida Set to Adopt Lawful Open Carry of Handguns For CCP Holders with Senate Judiciary Committee Boss Greg Steube's Bill SB 140, I'm Ready.

Florida Set to Adopt Lawful Open Carry of Handguns For CCP Holders with Senate Judiciary Committee Boss Greg Steube's Bill SB 140, I'm Ready. Florida valid concealed carry permit holders will soon be able to open carry their handgun. I have accumulated a variety of open carry handgun holsters over the years, most of them are molded leather holsters. There is an old saying among experienced hand gunners, “Every step toward holster retention is a step away from rapid deployment.” In layman’s terms, this means that the harder it is for a bad guy to get your gun out of your holster, the harder it is for you to get it out when you need it. “Retention holsters,” are popular with law enforcement officers, competitive action pistol shooters and handgun hunters and the requirements of each community are markedly different. Some competitors use holsters that are molded or “boned” to the handgun such that there is tension the full length of the handgun. (These types of holsters are also very popular with concealed handgun licensees.) In terms of citizens carrying self-defense handguns, a threshold question needs to be addressed. Should Florida law require that handguns that are carried openly be in a holster? If the answer is yes, then the decision must be made as to whether a holster must have any specific level of retention features. 

The Florida law should require a “holster” but in the broadest context. It is likely that open-carry demonstrations with rifle and shotguns will prompt the Legislature to require that a handgun be put in “something,” but that “something” should not be limited to a traditional shoulder or belt holster. “Holster” should encompass any device designed to hold a handgun securely while being carried on the body. If a holster is required, then there should be no specified number of retention devices or features as there is no one-size-fits-all that would be appropriate throughout the State. It could also prove problematic for certain persons such as women, the elderly and those with certain medical problems like arthritis to draw from a law enforcement-style retention holster.
Republican lawmaker Greg Steube has filed a bill that would make Florida the 46th state to adopt lawful open carry of handguns while dropping a number of mandated gun free zones. The measure, filed late Friday by the new head of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Greg Steube, R-Sarasota, would modify state law to allow for open carry as long as one had a valid concealed carry permit. Steube, a former state representative who sponsored pro-gun legislation in his stint in the Florida House, was tapped to replace outgoing Senate Judiciary Chairman Miguel Diaz de la Portilla, R-Miami, who repeatedly blocked gun reforms. Steube’s measure, SB 140, is sweeping in the respect that it not only authorizes Florida’s 1.6 million concealed carry permit holders to carry openly, but also trims away a number of long standing gun free zones. Among the areas affected would be secondary schools, career centers, and local government meetings. 

Get Firearm Training with a NRA Certified Instructor Concealed Weapon Class and G Firearms License Certification at Derek Jones Security Firearm Academy Sarasota Florida, learn how to draw and fire you handgun safely with Derek. Despite some of the most pro-gun laws in the country, Florida is just one of five states in the country that ban open carry and are in the same club that includes California, New York, South Carolina and Illinois. Florida allowed open carry until 1977. The Florida Supreme Court is currently reviewing the 2012 case of a who was found guilty by a lower court for the open carry of a weapon outside of his home after his handgun, which he had a concealed carry permit for, became visible. With a ruling in that litigation likely before the start of the 2017 legislative session, lawmakers may be forced to codify a change should the high court strike the ban. Legislation to pass open carry in the last session became a litmus test for law enforcement, with the Florida Police Chiefs Association supporting the move in a 15-7 vote while the Florida Sheriffs Association had 47 of 67 member sheriffs opposing the measure. Each side had very vocal champions with Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri contending open carry is fundamentally dangerous and Brevard County Sheriff Wayne Ivey arguing openly armed citizens represent a direct deterrent effect on crime.


Bill Warner Private Investigator Sarasota SEX, CRIME CHEATERS & TERRORISM at www.wbipi.com