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Tuesday, October 04, 2016

Attorney James T. Golden Dem Candidate District 73 Florida House of Rep Was Suspended for 90 Days by Florida Bar Who Then Sought his Disbarment in 1990


Elections for the Florida House of Representatives will take place in November 2016. The primary election took place on August 30, 2016, and the general election will be held on Tuesday November 8th 2016.  James T. Golden and Joe Gruters are running in the Florida House of Representatives District 73 general election. James T. Golden ran unopposed in the Florida House of Representatives District 73 Democratic primary. Attorney James T. Golden currently is a member of the Florida Bar in good standing.

 Florida House of Representatives, District 73 Republican Primary, 2016

Party Candidate Vote % Votes
     Republican Green check mark transparent.png Joe Gruters 50.95% 10,346
     Republican Steve Vernon 49.05% 9,961
Total Votes 20,307
Joe Gruters defeated Steve Vernon in the Florida House of Representatives District 73 Republican primary by only 346 votes, see above. As in all elections, the general public is entitled to have some vetting of candidates for public office, the who, what, where, why, and how come is relevant. So why did the Florida Bar seek the disbarment of Attorney James T. Golden in 1990?
 
Attorney/Pastor/Politician James T. Golden is the Democrat Candidate for District 73 Florida House of Representatives in the November 2016 Election. Attorney James T. Golden was suspended from the Florida Bar for 90 Days by the Supreme Court of Florida in 1988 and in 1990 the Florida Bar sought his disbarment. According to the filing of the Supreme Court of Florida, attorney James T. Golden was accused of Dereliction of Duty in a Malpractice case in Manatee County and did not file an amended Complaint for his client in a timely matter, again and again. On October 24th, 1988 attorney James T. Golden was suspended from practice as an attorney for 90 days and was fined $1,331.41 with a stipulation that upon paying the fine James T. Golden will be on probation for 1 year, so says the Supreme Court of Florida., see http://archive.law.fsu.edu/library/flsupct/70497/op-70497.pdf

Despite his Suspension and Probation James T. Golden continued to practice law in Manatee County Fl. On February 21, 1989 the Florida Bar filed its Motion For Order to Show Cause, see http://archive.law.fsu.edu/library/flsupct/73747/73747ans.pdf

The Florida Bar v. Golden 563 So. 2d 81 (1990)
THE FLORIDA BAR, Complainant, v. James T. GOLDEN, Respondent.
Supreme Court of Florida. May 31, 1990.
Rehearing Denied July 26, 1990.
John F. Harkness, Jr., Executive Director, and John T. Berry, Staff Counsel, Tallahassee, and Jan Wichrowski, Bar Counsel, Orlando, for complainant. Richard T. Earle, Jr. of Earle and Earle, St. Petersburg, for respondent.
PER CURIAM. In this proceeding we are concerned with whether Golden practiced law while under suspension and, if so, the determination of appropriate discipline therefor. We have jurisdiction. Art. V, § 15, Fla. Const. On September 22, 1988 this Court suspended Golden from the practice of law for ninety days, beginning October 24, 1988, and until paying the costs of the proceeding. The Florida Bar v. Golden, 530 So. 2d 931 (Fla. 1988). We also placed Golden on a one-year probation to begin upon his reinstatement, but, although we usually do so, we put no restrictions on Golden's securing new clients during the thirty-day hiatus between the filing of our opinion and the beginning of his suspension. On October 16, 1988, prior to the effective date of the suspension, a man contacted Golden about representing him on two separate traffic offenses. Golden agreed to represent him for a fee of $1,800 ($900 per case). The client paid him $600, and Golden drafted and filed two pleadings: a "written plea of not guilty, waiver of personal appearance" for one offense and a request for a continuance" for the other offense. The client signed the pleadings as pro se and, approximately two weeks later, paid Golden an additional $200.

On December 16, 1988 Golden arrived in Manatee County Court with his client, and the presiding judge notified Golden that he was aware of Golden's suspension and asked him to leave the courtroom. The bar thereafter filed a motion for order to show cause why Golden should not be held in contempt for failing to abide by his suspension. Golden contends there is no clear and convincing evidence that he practiced law while suspended. We agree that his practice was minimal, but declare that counseling and attempting to assist his client in requesting two continuances constituted the unauthorized practice of law. It appears that Golden shut down his office because the client unsuccessfully sought to find him there. There is a dispute in the testimony on whether Golden told the client he had been suspended for ninety days. Golden claimed he did while the client testified otherwise. The referee found that Golden had not notified this client of his suspension. We also note that there is no evidence that Golden furnished his clients with a copy of the order of suspension as required by rule 3-5.1(h), Rules Regulating The Florida Bar. Although the bar initially requested a ninety-one-day suspension, the referee recommended a one-year suspension due to the seriousness of Golden's failure to abide by his suspension, failure to inform the client of his suspension, failure to refund the $800, lack of remorse, and his lengthy history of past disciplinary actions. The Florida Bar v. Golden, 530 So. 2d 931 (Fla. 1988) (ninety-day suspension); The Florida Bar v. Golden, 502 So. 2d 891 (Fla. 1987) (ten-day suspension); The Florida Bar v. Golden, 401 So. 2d 1340 (Fla. 1981) (public reprimand).
In The Florida Bar v. Golden 401 So. 2d 1340 (Fla.1981) Complaint- James T. Golden was publicly reprimanded for borrowing $3,000, with his client's permission, for a supposedly short period of time and then failing to repay the loan for approximately two years despite repeated requests for repayment. The funds had been placed in Golden's trust account for a real estate transaction, which then fell through. Golden also failed to keep adequate records of trust accounting procedures for two years. The Florida bar, pursuant to action by the board of governors, now seeks disbarment of Attorney James T. Golden. SEE http://archive.law.fsu.edu/library/flsupct/73747/73747ini.pdf
Supreme Court of Florida Ruling: We believe the referee's recommendation is appropriate and should be approved. Had Golden's practice been more direct or more substantial, we would agree with the bar. Unfortunately, Golden's actions indicate he may have difficulty in fulfilling his role as an officer of the court, but we do not believe his presently determined malfeasance should cause disbarment. We therefore approve the referee's findings that Golden violated the terms of his ninety-day suspension. As penalty therefor Golden is suspended as a member of The Florida Bar for one year and thereafter until he has proved that he is rehabilitated. This suspension is to begin thirty days from the date this opinion is filed, thereby giving Golden time to notify his clients and close out his practice. He shall accept no new business during that thirty-day period. He is enjoined from practicing law until reinstated. Judgment for costs in the amount of $1,271.86 is hereby entered against Golden, for which sum let execution issue. It is so ordered.
EHRLICH, C.J., and OVERTON, McDONALD, BARKETT, GRIMES and KOGAN, JJ., concur.
SHAW, J., recused.

According to the Bio posted for James T. Golden, he received his Juris Doctorate degree in 1974. Admitted to the Florida Bar in 1975, James T. Golden was a practicing attorney until he felt the call of a different vocation in 1981, (according to his bio he stopped practicing law in 1981 on his own accord but he was suspended in 1988 by a court order and faced disbarment in 1990?). He then began attending the Turner Theological Seminary at Atlanta University, where he received his Master of Divinity degree in 1984. Since 1993, James T. Golden has served his community as pastor of Ward Temple A.M.E. Church in Bradenton, he also served two terms on the Bradenton City Council after being elected in 1999 and 2003. James T. Golden is a 2016 Democratic candidate for District 73 of the Florida House of Representatives. Golden was a candidate for the District 5 seat on the Manatee County School Board in Florida. He faced Julie B. Aranibar, Mary S. Cantrell and Carlton "Les" Nichols in the general election on August 26, 2014.

Candidate Vote % Votes
     Nonpartisan Green check mark transparent.pngJulie B. Aranibar Incumbent 37.1% 15,018
     Nonpartisan Green check mark transparent.pngMary S. Cantrell 35.3% 14,274
     Nonpartisan James T. Golden 17.8% 7,193
     Nonpartisan Carlton "Les" Nichols 9.9% 3,996
Total Votes 40,481

Golden received a total of $6,435.00 in campaign contributions and spent a total of $4,719.94, according to the Manatee County Supervisor of Elections. Golden did not receive an endorsement in this election.

Sunday, October 02, 2016

Horn Dog Bill Clinton's 5,000 sf 'Love Shack' on Top of His Little Rock Ark Library He Plans to Have Naked Pool Parties and Wet T-shirt Contests.



Horn Dog Bill Clinton's 5,000 sf 'Love Shack' on Top of His Little Rock Ark Library He Plans to Have Naked Pool Parties and Wet T-shirt Contests. NY POST: Bill Clinton was getting a foot massage. “We were on the terrace of his apartment,” recalled the 20-something intern at the William J. Clinton Presidential Library and Museum who was massaging Bill’s feet. “We had a meal served from 42 [the restaurant in the Little Rock library] — ­vegan stuff like kale salad. “He often invites girls like me who work at the library to his apartment for a glass of red wine and a massage,” the intern said in an interview for this book. “He likes his neck and shoulders massaged because he gets knots in his muscles. But what he really likes is to have his feet massaged. He just kicks off his loafers and socks and puts his feet on the coffee table. That really makes him happy. In the midst of the massage, the phone rang. Clinton listened for a moment, then put down the receiver. “Damn!” he said, according to the ­intern’s recollection. “What’s wrong?” she asked. “Hillary just told a bunch of Iowa Democrats she’s on Snapchat,” Clinton said. “So what?” the young intern said. “I’m on Snapchat. Everybody’s on Snapchat.”
 
“Yeah, but she said she loves Snapchat because all her e-mails disappear by themselves,” Clinton said. “I still don’t understand,” the intern said. “Just keep doing what you’re doing,” Clinton said. While the intern went back to massaging his feet, Clinton made another call. He informed the person on the other end of the line that Hillary had cracked a joke about her disappearing e-mails at the Wing Ding dinner in Clear Lake, Iowa. “I was with him at the apartment in Little Rock after a long telephone conversation with Hillary in which he held the phone away from his ear because she was shouting that he was interfering with her campaign. Finally, he cut her short and said he would call back later. He didn’t exactly hang up on her, but it was very close. “Afterward, he slumped down in a chair and shook his head. He looked old and defeated. Then he got up, went out to his rooftop putting green, and started chipping shots into the Arkansas River. When he was done, he looked like his old self again. ‘He served champagne and cold beer and handed out roses…At one point, he got out a hose and sprayed some of the girls.’ .
“He said, ‘She can do whatever the f–k she wants,’ and he started talking about his plans for building a swimming pool on the roof of the library. He wants to have naked pool parties the way JFK had pool parties when he was in the White House. “He had an architect give him a feasibility report on building a pool, and it turned out that it would have been very expensive to build and disruptive to the functioning of the library. Anyway, the National Archives, which administers presidential libraries, probably would have vetoed the idea. So he dropped the plan. But for a while, he thought about getting an above-ground pool for the girls to splash around in. “Bill has a bunch of women he regularly invites to his apartment. Most of them are young and good looking. He loves being surrounded by pretty girls. The place is completely secure, so he knows there’s no chance any photographers can get in. “I was there at one of his parties on a hot, steamy day. He served champagne and cold beer and handed out roses, which he grows on the terrace and which are named after his mother, Virginia Kelley. At one point, he got out a hose and sprayed some of the girls. “‘Keep that up,’ I told him, ‘and you’re going to have the first wet T-shirt contest ever held at a presidential library.’ ”



Bill Warner Private Investigator Sarasota SEX, CRIME CHEATERS & TERRORISM at www.wbipi.com

CHEATERS: Trump’s Claim That Hillary Clinton Cheated on Bill Rings True in Vince Foster Love Affair and Murder Claims P.I.

CHEATERS: In a typical left wing liberal media cover-up for the Clinton's CNN's Jack Tapper defended Hillary and vehemently disputed Donald Trump's claim that Hillary Clinton was an adulteress and cheated on Bill. Tapper said Trump was "just making stuff up" in an interview with Rudy Giuliani while Mayor Rudy backed up Trump's statement, WTH: "Rudy Giuliani drudged up past Bill Clinton infidelities during testy Sunday appearances and argued he’s the “right person to level this charge.”In a heated exchange on CNN’s “State of the Union” Giuliani backed up Donald Trump’s accusation over the weekend that Hillary Clinton is an adulteress. The former mayor and top Trump surrogate said the unsubstantiated charge is “fair game.” Tapper shot back: “Just to make stuff up? Just wild accusations Hillary Clinton’s cheating on Bill? No proof of it whatsoever? Everything’s fair game?” Perhaps CNN's Jack tapper should do a little fact checking and get his head out of his ass, read on.......
A book by Christopher Andersen entitled "Bill and Hillary: The Marriage" claims that Foster and Hillary Clinton were involved in an affair that led to Foster's death. According to Ambrose Evans-Pritchard in a 1996 Telegraph (UK) article, Hillary Clinton asked Vince Foster to help her spy on her husband in 1990. Foster hired Jerry Parks, an Arkansas investigator who later worked as the head of security for the Clinton/Gore campaign. According to Parks’s widow, “Jerry asked Vince why he needed this stuff on Clinton. He said he needed it for Hillary.” When Vince Foster showed up dead in a Washington-area public park in the summer of 1993, Parks was terrified. Two months later Parks was shot nine times at close range, at a stoplight, in his SUV, in Little Rock Arkansas. Parks’s home was then raided by eight Federal agents, including officers from the FBI, IRS, Secret Service, and (unusual for a domestic case) the CIA.
1992..The Worthen Bank givesBill Clinton a $3.5 million line of credit allowing the cash-strapped presidential candidate to finish the primaries. A massive "bimbo" patrol is established to threaten, buy, or otherwise disarm scores of women who have had sexual encounters with Bill Clinton. The campaign uses private investigators in an extensive operation that will be joked about at the time but later will be seen as a form of blackmail as well as psychological and physical intimidation. After the election Vincent Foster meets with James McDougal and arranges for him to buy the Clintons' remaining shares in Whitewater Development Co. for $1,000.
1993.. Two Arkansas state troopers describe arguments between the Clintons, including (in the words of Washington Times reporter Jerry Seper) "Hillary Clinton fuled foul-mouthed shouting matches and furniture-breaking sessions." Hillary Clinton and David Watkins move to oust the White House travel office in favor of World Wide Travel, Clinton's source of $1 million in fly-now-pay-later campaign trips. The White House fires seven long-term employees for alleged mismanagement and kickbacks. The director, Billy Dale, charged with embezzlement, will be acquitted in less than two hours by the jury. Vince Foster, the Clintons' attorney, finally files several missing Whitewater tax returns.
1993..On July 19, FBI director William Sessions is fired. Clinton personally orders him by phone to turn in his FBI property and leave headquarters. That evening, Clinton security aide Jerry Parks' wife Jane says she overhears a heated telephone conversation with Vince Foster in which her husband says, "You can't give Hillary those files, they've got my name all over them." On July 20, Clinton names Louis Freeh as Sessions' successor. That same day, the FBI raids David Hale's Little Rock office and seizes documents including those relating to Capital-Management. Just hours after the search warrant authorizing the raid is signed by a federal magistrate in Little Rock, Vince Foster apparently drives to Ft. Marcy Park without any car keys in a vehicle that changes color over the next few hours, walks across 700 feet of park without accruing any dirt or grass stains, and then shoots himself with a vanishing bullet that leaves only a small amount of blood. Or at least that is what would have to had occurred if official accounts are to be reconciled with the available evidence. There are numerous other anomalies in this quickly-declared suicide. Despite two badly misleading independent counsel reports, Foster's death will remain an unsolved mystery. Less than three hours after Foster's body is found, his office is secretly searched by Clinton operatives, including Hillary Clinton's chief of staff. Another search occurs two days later.
Meanwhile, US Park Police and FBI agents are not allowed to search the office on grounds of "executive privilege." Writing of the purported Hillary Clinton divorce draft papers of 1988, journalist Philip Weisss will report: "That file still existed in '93, and the Clintons were scared it would get out. Remember--and this is fact--that on the night of Foster's death in July 93, his office was rifled of files. And the phone records unearthed by Michael Chertoff suggested strongly that Hillary Clinton was in on that activity, talking to Maggie Williams and Bernie Nussbaum and as I recall Susan Thomases too, in a series of frenetic calls that night. . . .Two months after Foster died, a former Clinton aide named Luther "Jerry" Parks was murdered gangland style as he drove through Little Rock. ... Parks's son told me that his father had worked with Foster to put together the divorce file, and that he kept a copy of that file, and the Clinton people wanted it. There have been suggestions that Parks was shaking people down with what he knew; and he came to a bad end."

Vincent Foster Deputy White House Counsel Died: July 21, 1993. Found dead in Ft. Marcy Park in Washington, DC, of a supposed suicide by gunshot. A suicide note was supposedly found a few days later, torn into several pieces, in his briefcase, after his office had been entered by White House staff and materials removed. The "suicide" note, (leaked despite official efforts to keep it from view) has since been revealed to be a forgery. Neither Foster's fingerprints or blood were on the gun he supposedly inserted into his mouth and fired. There was no blood on Foster's hands. Foster was also from Hope, Ark., like Hillary and Bill Clinton, and also worked for the Rose Law firm as did Hillary. Foster had intimate knowledge of the Clintons' personal finances. Foster was involved in an investigation of their finances, and reportedly made a phone call to Hillary Clinton, in Los Angeles, just hours before his death. Foster had been called to testify to Congress about the records Hillary refused to turn over. More than a few Little Rock insiders believe Hillary Clinton was having an affair with Vince Foster.



Bill Warner Private Investigator Sarasota SEX, CRIME CHEATERS & TERRORISM at www.wbipi.com