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Friday, May 27, 2011

Portsmouth NH Woman Loses $13,000 In Online Dating Scam, the dangerous side of online dating you better check them out.



Police say they woman was swindled out of nearly $13,000 by a man from Malaysia, and she's probably not going to get the money back. The scam was reported to police last weekend.

Police say she met the man through a legitimate online dating service and developed a relationship via emails, text messages and telephone conversations. The man said he was having "financial difficulties" and she wired him money over several months.

Eventually he stopped contacting her and she discovered that his email address and telephone number were no longer in service. Deputy Police Chief Stephen DuBois says be "skeptical" when someone you meet online asks for money.


PANAMA CITY BEACH, FLORIDA // With as many as 40 million single Americans using online dating services or web-networking sites such as MySpace (or Facebook) to look for love, it would seem that there has never been an easier time to find a soulmate online.

But experts, law enforcement officials and private investigators warn that the world of internet romance is fraught with peril, ranging from liars to sexual predators and even murderers, who hide their motives behind seemingly innocuous virtual identities.

The numbers are worrisome – and horror stories abound. In February, MySpace was forced to cancel 90,000 accounts on its site that authorities revealed were linked to registered sex offenders. It was a fraction of the 130 million users of the site, but a significant percentage of the more than one million registered sex offenders in the United States.

Bill Warner, a Florida private investigator who offers on his website to “sort out the winners from the losers” for a flat fee of US$169, says running background checks on potential internet dates now constitutes more than 50 per cent of his business. “Usually the problem is that the man is married or he turns out to be one of these crazy stalker people that follows a woman for months,” he said in a telephone interview.



In many cases, Mr Warner said he would discover that men had joined a site using a false name, a prepaid, throwaway cell phone and a phoney e-mail address from free services such as Yahoo or Hotmail. “There are a lot of people out there who get jazzed up by disguising themselves,” he said, adding that nearly 100 per cent of his cases involved women being victimised by men.

Industry experts say the website http://www.true.com/ is unique in the field for warning on its home page that criminals and married men who come hunting “will be sorry if they do”. The site recently sued a convicted sex offender in California who tried to register himself as an eligible bachelor. But True.com is one of the few online dating websites to actually run background checks on its members, even though a recent survey found that a majority of people visiting online dating sites believed that most did.



“It’s shameful because it lulls women into a false sense of security,” said Mr Warner. “You get young naive women or the over-50 year olds who are recently divorced, they are often excited about meeting a new man and they make easy prey.” In some instances, the first date ends in violence. Last October, for example, police in Minnesota charged a 39-year-old man with raping a woman he met through the internet, after he slipped drugs into her drink that caused her to pass out.

In other cases, the motive is financial. Police in Tampa, Florida last January arrested a Tennessee man who was wanted for swindling a woman he met online out of tens of thousands of dollars and leasing a Mercedes in her name that he wrecked, leaving her with more than $60,000 in liabilities, MORE FROM THIS SOURCE…………….



Bill Warner Private Investigator, SEX, CRIME, CHEATERS & TERRORISM at www.wbipi.com