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Saturday, July 10, 2010

Russian KGB Spy Sergei Tretyakov Was the Boss Of Anna Chapman Types and 60 Other Russian Spies, He Lived For 10 years in the Sarasota Fl area



Master KGB Spy Sergei Tretyakov, his photo above, defected with his wife and daughter in October 2000 from Russia and purchaed a house, for cash, on Park Trace Blvd in Osprey Fl, a suburb of Sarasota near the Legacy bike trail, in March of 2001, he had also listed an address in Madison New Jersey and a condo unit on Midnight Pass Rd Siesta Key Fl.


FBI Investigated Kushchenko Family Of Russian Spy Anna Chapman Ten Years Ago, Turncoat Russian Spy “Boss” Sergei Tretyakov Defects to Osprey Fl USA Ten Years Ago.


Russian Spy Sergei Tretyakov at the time of his defection in October 2000 was in charge of all Russian spies in New York City.  At the time of his defection on Oct. 11, 2000, Mr. Tretyakov allegedly had been working as a double agent for the United States for three years while he was the KGB aka SVR's second-in-command in New York. From 1995 to 2000,  Sergei Tretyakov oversaw all Russian covert operations in New York City and had more than 60 intelligence officers under his command.



Anna Chapman and her crew of 10 other Russian spies in the New York City area had been outed to the FBI in 2000, Sergei Tretyakov in 2000, was in charge of all Russian spies in the New York City area, Sergei Tretyakov was the "boss'" of Anna Chapman types and 60 other Russian spies. 


Sergei Tretyakov was not some "good ole boy" living in a suburb of Sarasota Fl since March of 2001, Russian Spy Sergei Tretyakov 'Helped Saddam Hussein's regime in Iraq Steal Cash From UN in the oil-for-food programme' .  Sergei Tretyakov was living on Park Trace Blvd in Osprey Fl a suburb of Sarasota in March of 2001, he had been in the Sarasota area on Midnight Pass Rd Siesta Key prior to that date.  Col. Tretyakov was the New York deputy resident of the SVR, the successor to the KGB's foreign intelligence directorate. Tretyakov was initially the Russian mission at Ottawa. In 1995 was assigned to the United Nations where he was was a senior aide to Russia's veteran U.N. ambassador, Sergey Lavrov. 


Tretyakov first tried to defect around 1997 but agreed to remain as an "agent in place," passing secrets to the FBI. he defected in October 2000, when he vanished from a Russian residential compound in the Bronx with his wife, daughter and cat. The United States acknowledged his defection four months later in Feb. 2001. (He purchaed a house, for cash, on Park Trace Blvd in Osprey Fl (a suburb of Sarasota) in March of 2001 under his real name). He gave the FBI 5,000 secret SVR cables and more than 100 Russian intelligence reports.


"Anna Chapman was arrested after sending secret information to a handler via a computer while sitting in a New York City coffee shop. The handler was outside in a car, and the two communicated with a secret closed circuit network. U.S. agents (FBI) had been following Chapman and the other 10 spies -- including four married couples, all living in Boston, New York, New Jersey, and Virginia -- for the better part of 20 years.  Some of the stolen information included details on nuclear weapon development, U.S. policies on the use of the Internet by terrorists, and goods on the new CIA leader and the 2008 Presidential election".


Federal agents arrested 10 alleged members of a “20 year long-term, deep-cover” Russian spy ring whose ultimate goal was to infiltrate U.S. policy-making circles, according to the Justice Department.  The arrests in the New York area, Boston and Arlington, Virginia, broke up a Russian spy group that began operating in the 1990s, (Sergei Tretyakov was in charge of all New York City Russian spies from 1995 to 2000 he moved to Osprey Fl in late 2000) according to two criminal complaints unsealed yesterday in Manhattan federal court.  The alleged ring included Russian agents posing as American and Canadian citizens, some of them living in the U.S. for more than 20 years, with the goal of becoming “Americanized” and passing intelligence back to the Russian Federation, according to court papers.



Russian Spy Sergei Tretyakov, his photo above, 'Helped Iraq Steal From UN' ...A former Russian spymaster has said his agents helped the Russian government steal nearly $500m (£252m) from the UN's oil-for-food programme in Iraq.  Sergei Tretyakov says he helped Saddam Hussein's regime manipulate the price of Iraqi oil sold under the programme. The scheme was set up to ease the suffering of ordinary Iraqis under UN sanctions imposed after Saddam's 1990 invasion of Kuwait


It allowed Iraq to sell oil provided the bulk of the proceeds were used to buy food, medicine and other humanitarian goods and to pay war reparations. However, a UN investigation has accused 2,200 companies from 40 countries of cheating the scheme out of some $1.8bn (about £908m). The former spy, who defected to the US in 2000 as a double agent, said this allowed Russia to skim profits on the scheme.


Mr Tretyakov was the deputy head of intelligence at Russia's UN mission from 1995 to 2000.  Among the spies he says he recruited for Russia were a Canadian nuclear weapons expert who became a UN nuclear verification expert in Vienna, a senior Russian official in the oil-for-food programme and a former Soviet bloc ambassador. He describes a Russian businessman who got hold of a nuclear bomb, and kept it stored in a shed at his dacha outside Moscow.  He said of the UN: "It's an international spy nest.  "Inside the UN, we were fishing for knowledgeable diplomats who could give us first of all anti-American information."

NY Times Published: July 9, 2010....Sergei Tretyakov, a high-ranking Russian spy who defected to the United States after the end of the cold war, died on June 13 at his home in Osprey Florida (a suburb of Sarasota). He was 53. His wife, Helen, announced his death on Friday on the Washington radio station WTOP.

Pete Earley, the author of a book about Mr. Tretyakov, “Comrade J.: The Untold Secrets of Russia’s Master Spy in America After the End of the Cold War” (2008), wrote on his Web site, http://www.peteearley.com/ , that Ms. Tretyakov gave the cause of death as coronary arrest, and that she had asked her husband’s friends not to reveal the fact of his death until an autopsy could be performed under the supervision of the F.B.I.  The KGB has the "memory of the elephant" they never forgot that Sergei Tretyakov was one of their top agents, a "Boss", and he went over to the FBI and exposed all of their operations on the East Coast of the USA, he had a contract on his head from at least October of 2000.


David Winterhalter, the director of investigations for the medical examiner’s office in Sarasota County, Florida, said that an autopsy had been completed and that his office was waiting for standard histology and toxicology tests to be completed before stating the cause of death. The F.B.I., he said, “is aware of everything that is going on.”

Mr. Tretyakov (pronounced tray-tya-COUGH), called Comrade J. by American intelligence officers, defected with his wife and daughter in October 2000. At the time, he held the title of first secretary of the Russian mission in New York and senior aide to the Russian ambassador to the United Nations, Sergey V. Lavrov. In fact he was a colonel in the S.V.R., the Russian intelligence service that replaced the K.G.B. From 1995 to 2000 he was responsible for all covert operations in New York City and at the United Nations, (he was the "Boss").   “My defection was the major failure of the Russian intelligence, probably in its whole history,” Mr. Tretyakov told NPR, the public radio network, in 2008.
After he defected, he lived in hiding (actually in plain sight, he purchased a home in the Sarasota Fl area under his real name) with his wife and daughter, Ksenya, who also survives him and his cat. All three became American citizens.   When “Comrade J.” was published, Mr. Tretyakov began making public appearances. After that he lived more or less openly, under his own name and without protection, although when he traveled abroad he had an F.B.I. escort.  Mr. Earley, on NPR, said he was told by the F.B.I. that Mr. Tretyakov had received the largest money settlement ever given to a defecting Russian spy, more than $2 million.



Bill Warner Private Investigator, SEX, CRIME, CHEATERS & TERRORISM at www.wbipi.com