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Saturday, February 27, 2010

Online Dating Goes for the Younger Crowd, 'Matchmaking' in Middle School Angers Parents of 11 Year Old Girl.

Matchmaking Web sites have become immensely popular on the dating scene for young adults, but how would you feel if your elementary school-age child was participating in surveys to find their ‘love connection?’


The Elwood Community School drama club in Elwood, Ind., is using their own matchmaking Web site for fundraising. The Web site was created by the school, and students in grades six through 10 can pay to find a compatible boyfriend or girlfriend, WISH-TV reported.


Parent Michelle Everett found out about the fundraiser when she found a match survey in her 11-year-old daughter’s book bag. The fundraiser takes place without parental consent slips, like most other school fundraising campaigns.
"I don't believe that at 11 years old a school should be promoting opposite sex matching," Everett said. "A tenth-grader matched with a sixth-grader? And the school is promoting it, and it's inappropriate."


Everett saw red flags when she read the survey that said it listed all the compatible matches of the opposite sex. Despite Everett’s alleged phone calls to the school, the superintendent said he has not received any official complaints from parents. He claimed the survey is harmless, and has been raising money for the school for the past 15 years, more from this source......
The dangerous side of online dating, by Gretchen Peters, Foreign Correspondent, The National Dubai UAE.“When we pushed for more stringent background checks on online dating sites, one company told us the idea of asking for disclosure was creepy,” said Bill Noble, the director of the Safer Online Dating Alliance. “But what is actually creepy is having these creeps on your site.”

PANAMA CITY BEACH, FLORIDA // With as many as 40 million single Americans using online dating services or web-networking sites such as MySpace to look for love, it would seem that there has never been an easier time to find a soulmate online.

But experts, law enforcement officials and private investigators warn that the world of internet romance is fraught with peril, ranging from liars to sexual predators and even murderers, who hide their motives behind seemingly innocuous virtual identities.

The numbers are worrisome – and horror stories abound. In February, MySpace was forced to cancel 90,000 accounts on its site that authorities revealed were linked to registered sex offenders. It was a fraction of the 130 million users of the site, but a significant percentage of the more than one million registered sex offenders in the United States.

In April a Boston medical student, Philip Markoff, dubbed the “Craigslist killer” by the media, was arrested and changed with murdering a masseuse who advertised on the popular website’s erotic services section.

Two months later Craigslist was hit with another scandal when it emerged that a North Carolina man used the site to hire a man to rape his wife while the husband watched.

Bill Warner, a Florida private investigator who offers on his website to “sort out the winners from the losers” for a flat fee of US$169 (Dh620), says running background checks on potential internet dates now constitutes more than 50 per cent of his business.

“Usually the problem is that the man is married or he turns out to be one of these crazy stalker people that follows a woman for months,” he said in a telephone interview.

In many cases, Mr Warner said he would discover that men had joined a site using a false name, a prepaid, throwaway cell phone and a phoney e-mail address from free services such as Yahoo or Hotmail.

“There are a lot of people out there who get jazzed up by disguising themselves,” he said, adding that nearly 100 per cent of his cases involved women being victimised by men.

Industry experts say the website True.com is unique in the field for warning on its home page that criminals and married men who come hunting “will be sorry if they do”.

Industry experts say the website True.com is unique in the field for warning on its home page that criminals and married men who come hunting “will be sorry if they do”.  The site recently sued a convicted sex offender in California who tried to register himself as an eligible bachelor.


In some instances, the first date ends in violence. Last October, for example, police in Minnesota charged a 39-year-old man with raping a woman he met through the internet, after he slipped drugs into her drink that caused her to pass out, more from this source..........

Bill Warner Director of CSPI..Covert Surveillance by Private Investigators at WBI Inc.