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Friday, November 28, 2008

Mumbai Attack: 'British Muslim "Paki" Men Among Terrorists', Some Possibly Worked at the Hotels as Porters to Obtain Inside Intel.

British men were among the terrorists who killed at least 143 in the attacks in Mumbai. By Jon Swaine: 28 Nov 2008. Some of the Muslim terrorists could have been guests at the Hotels, others could have obtained jobs as porters to obtain Intel.

Vilasrao Deshmukh, the chief minister of Mumbai, was reported to have said that two British-born Pakistanis were among eight gunmen seized by Indian commandos who stormed buildings to free hostages.

The Foreign Office said it was investigating reports on NDTV, a local television news channel, that the terrorists – who swarmed into luxury hotels and other tourist sites in the city – included "British citizens of Pakistani origin".Jacqui Smith, the Home Secretary, said the Government had "no knowledge" of any British suspects. "We will do anything we can to help Indian authorities through what is obviously a very difficult time," Miss Smith said. "We will do what is necessary.

At the moment the priority is to support the immediate needs.Earlier on Friday, Gordon Brown said he "would not want to be drawn into early conclusions" over the claims. The Prime Minister called for international co-ordination to combat terrorism in the wake of the attacks, which he called "atrocious". He said: "We have got to look at how international action against terrorism can be improved." "Obviously when you have terrorists operating in one country, they may be getting support from another country or coming from another country, and it is very important that we strengthen the co-operation between India and Britain in dealing with these instances of terrorist attacks," he told Sky News.

The Prime Minister's comments came as Indian commando troops cleared the last terrorists from buildings across Mumbai. The troops killed at least two militants at the Trident Oberoi hotel, where police found 24 bodies. About 93 guests and staff – including two Britons and another clutching a baby – were rushed out and loaded into waiting cars, buses and ambulances.JK Dutt, the director general of India's National Security Guard, said the hotel had been brought "under our control". "We have killed two terrorists today," he said. "There was lots of firing, they also lobbed hand grenades. Some of them are unexploded, we are going to defuse them – you may hear some sound of explosions."

It is thought that more than 100 commandos entered the Taj Mahal hotel – in which a hostage situation was thought to have ended on Thursday – and gunfire and explosions have been heard. Police reported finding at least 30 bodies in one hall of the hotel.


Troops also stormed the Nariman House complex in the south of the city, which houses a Jewish group. A woman and a child were seen leaving the building after the commandos, who arrived in helicopters, abseiled down ropes to secure the building.

Mr Brown, who is to talk to Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh later on Friday, said he did not believe there were any further Britons among the hostages. One Briton, Andreas Liveras, the founder of a luxury yacht business who was in his 70s, has been confirmed among the dead, while at least seven are known to have been injured. Mr Brown said: "Of course, we are mourning the death of a British citizen who has died and as the high commissioner visits hospitals in the Mumbai area, we are hoping to discover more in terms of the number of people injured."


Mark Abell, a British lawyer, who on Thursday spoke to The Daily Telegraph while barricaded into his hotel room at the Oberoi, was among those released. He said: "I'm going home, I'm going to see my wife." He added: "These people here have been fantastic, the Indian authorities, the hotel staff. I think they are a great advertisement for their country."

A group calling itself Deccan Mujahideen has claimed responsibility for the attacks. However, Mr Singh blamed "external forces" for the violence - a phrase sometimes used to refer to Pakistani militants, whom Indian authorities often blame for attacks." Pranab Mukherjee, the country's foreign minister, was more explicit. "According to preliminary information, some elements in Pakistan are responsible," he said.

The suggestion that some British nationals may be involved in the terrorist attacks in Mumbai confirms the worldwide nature of the terrorist web whose poisonous spiders lurk in the lawless northern regions of Pakistan.


Intelligence officials in the UK say there is no evidence yet to confirm this but it would not be surprising if it were true.
British nationals with Pakistani backgrounds have been involved in many terrorist incidents, both in this country and abroad.


The first indications that radicalised British Muslims were travelling abroad to fight emerged from Bosnia in the mid-1990s. In 1998, British casualties were reported among the dead in mujahideen camps in Afghanistan attacked by American missiles.

In 2002, the American journalist Daniel Pearl was kidnapped and murdered in Pakistan by Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh. Originally from east London, he attended a British public school before dropping out of the LSE. Another British-born Muslim extremist, belonging to the Pakistani-based militant organisation Jaish-i-Muhamnmad, killed 32 people when he rammed a lorry packed with explosives into an Indian army barracks in Kashmir.

In 2003, two other British, Asif Mohammed Hanif and Omar Sharif, travelled to Tel Aviv to carry out a suicide bomb attack there. One thing that all had in common, apart from their faith, is that they attended mosques or events in Britain where fundamentalist messages were routinely issued. They also had family links with Pakistan which made it easier for them to travel to the country where they would be trained by jihadists. They had already been radicalised at home. An estimated 400,000 trips a year are made by Britons of Pakistani origin to their ancestral homeland.

While radicalised Islamists may have attended mainstream schools, they do so in the company of other Muslims. After school, they may have special Koranic classes. They go to mosques where preachers extol the glories of jihad. They belong to a stratum of our society that disavows the mainstream culture and is often divorced from it. They own their greater allegiance to their faith and to politics than to Britain.


Bill Warner
Private Investigator
www.wbipi.com